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Friday Sessions



This list is intended to provide you with information about sessions that have been scheduled for the conference.

It is subject to change.



 
2018 Fall Conference on Science Education

Navigating Phenomena-
Based Storylines
Buoying Math and Literacy with Science & Technology Integration Science Education Resources & Strategies 
Learning Where You Live with Place-Based Education
Coastal Learning Symposium Strand*

*The Coastal Learning Symposium Strand is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Aquarium.  CLS attendees may include the OSTA Fall Conference Strand access by adding it to their registration.




Navigating Phenomena-Based Storylines

General Audiences

General Science

Dive Deep into the Crosscutting Concepts

Learn how the crosscutting concepts be used as a lens to make sense of phenomena. Leverage the use of crosscutting concepts to increase depth and complexity of the disciplinary core ideas. Elementary teachers you will receive a flipbook that includes discussion questions, sentence stems, and more for each of the crosscutting concepts that can be used with any lesson. Middle and High school teachers will walk a way with a set of concept maps for each of the crosscutting concepts that will help you “dive deep” into your disciplinary core ideas.

Angie Arends, Clackamas ESD

General Science

Essential oils from plants

Even before history was recorded, humans have been fascinated by the essential oils plants offer. It remains an intriguing field that can be used to stimulate and enable students to pursue learning within STEM and beyond. Participants will help extract essential oils from readily obtainable inexpensive botanical samples, learn results we've seen students achieve and gain tools for their own consideration.

David Hackleman, Oregon State University

Earth & Space Science

Exploring the Axial Seamount!

Explore the Axial Seamount using a project-based learning simulation that puts students in the shoes of a team of deep sea researchers using a research vessel, remotely operated vehicle, and real world data to investigate seismic activity at the Axial Seamount of the coast off Oregon. This project integrates real-world data, science professions, NGSS, and teamwork in a rigorous science and engineering challenge.

Adam Talamantes, SMILE Precollege Programs Oregon State University

General Science

Modeling Phenomena on the Cheap

Model geology phenomena like the asthenosphere, rock, and water cycles using cheap, safe, (mostly) easily available materials. Lead your students into science with fun hands-on affordable activities. Most materials can be purchased at the local supermarket. Use cookies, ice cream, slime and simple chromatography to generate interest and increase participation.

Karen Blaettler, Blaettler Consulting

General Science

Phenomena Driven Instruction and Formative Assessment

This professional learning opportunity focuses on high leverage instructional practices called for in the 2014 Oregon Science Standards (Next Generation Science Standards). We will promote 3-dimensional, phenomena-driven instruction, and the formative assessment process. This presentation will provide relevant instructional practices that are student-centered to foster opportunity and access for all learners. Participants will receive an overview of research based instructional practices to help students gain valuable learning experiences, engage peer-to-peer discourse, increase language acquisition, and foster a growth mindset while enhancing equitable practices.

Noelle Gorbett, Oregon Department of Education

General Science

Phenomenon-Mah na mah na: How to use an local anchoring phenomena to drive a lesson series

The session goal is for attendees to receive an overview of how to create a lesson series based on an NGSS-designed anchoring phenomenon. This session is designed for intermediate to advanced attendees in the use of phenomena. Attendees will walk away with all the needed strategies to create a lesson series based upon a local phenomenon in their classroom. Focus is how we created two different lesson series around local phenomenon, the reintroduction of the Black-Footed Ferret in Rocky Mountain Arsenal and the sudden appearance of algae on Denver’s City Park Lake. Discussions about the criteria used to choose the phenomenon and how student voice was used to personally connect how to solve these issues within their community. Activities will include attendees using the process of unpacking the standards to ensure the phenomenon covers the needed components of the NGSS standards and a step-by-step organizer for how we created our own integrated lesson series using the procedures for vetting phenomenon by William Penuel and Phillip Bell.

Kathryn Fleegal, Denver Public Schools

Education Research

The Design and Invention Project – Integrated STEM Modules for Engaging All Students by Connecting to Daily Life

Come and learn about teacher experiences in increasing STEM engagement in the Design and Invention project - a collaborative initiative between Oregon MESA, the PSU College of Engineering, and high school science teachers. Our aim was to develop highly engaging STEM project design units that would appeal to all students by mapping onto real needs in their daily lives. Three modules were developed around themes in traditional Physics (Music, Waves & Vibes), Chemistry (Emergency Batteries), and Biology and Environmental Science (Clean Water). Each unit maps onto traditional science concepts, can be completed over a two to three week period, and meets a range of NGSS performance expectations at the high school and middle school levels. The modules provide opportunities for students to explore core ideas in science, and then use the engineering and invention process to develop solutions relevant to their daily lives. Each module was piloted in multiple high schools and we will share the results from the classroom pilots, student and teacher feedback, along with pointers to instructional materials (slides, worksheets, resources) for your own classroom use.

Mihir Ravel, Cary Sneider, Jennifer Wells, Steve Scannell, Julie Trisel, Brian Fain, Dan Robinette, Alan Deale, Joel McKee, Jomae Sica

High School (9-12)

General Science

Cancer Medicine Focus Connects Students to Real-Life STEM Applications of Cryopreservation and Biomaterials Technologies

Using a specific biomedical research area as an organizational theme for teaching biology provides a context for student learning and answers that question, “Why do I need to know this?” Oncofertility, a new field of medicine, encompasses comprehensive approaches to preserving fertility in patients before their cancer treatment begins. Students choose a cancer patient who desires to become a parent as a case study, and integrate their knowledge in biological, bioengineering, and ethical concepts, including cell division, genetics, reproduction, cryobiology, and biomaterials, that are explored under the umbrella concept of oncofertility. Students then pursue answers to these types of questions relative to their patient: How do cancer and normal cells differ? How do cancer treatments affect patient fertility? How can fertility be preserved? Who legally owns cryopreserved eggs and sperm if the patient does not survive? Given a context for learning, students grasp science concepts more quickly, are inspired to learn and possibly pursue a career in biomedical research or medicine. In oncofertility research, scientists are freezing ovarian tissue for transplantation of follicles containing oocytes (eggs). Hands-on activities in this workshop include determining which cryopreservation solution is least damaging to tissue, and exploring alginate as a biomaterial for 3-dimensional follicle growth as the oocyte matures in vitro. Participants will use our free, NGSS-aligned, NIH-sponsored online curriculum that supports this approach to learning and provides context for laboratory activities easily implemented in the classroom.

Mary Zelinski, Oregon National Primate Research Center

Life Sciences

Investigating Human Population Growth

This presentation will inform participants on how to implement a three-dimensional lab that uses the science practices of Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking and Engaging in Argument from Evidence to investigate the core idea of unfettered population growth (HS-LS2-1) while focusing on crosscutting concepts of Patterns as well as Cause and Effect and Scale, Proportion and Quantity. The project begins by making a prediction for the world’s population in 2050. Students analyze and graph data reflecting total fertility rates in various countries. They engage in discussion around the different data sets, classifying and analyzing the growth curves. Conversations continue about the factors that limit population growth, learning about how population growth is actually calculated by demographers and making world population estimates using published annual percent growth figures. The project ends when we return to the original question of the 2050 world population and compare our new, data-informed estimates to the figures published by demography experts. The work sample template provided to students is scaffolded to provide the supports necessary for every student to be successful.

Charlotte Denis, Mountainside High School / Beaverton School District

Physical Sciences

Music, Waves, and Vibes – Engaging All Students in Physics by Integrating Design & Invention into Traditional Science

This hands-on session lets you try a highly engaging STEM unit that can be completed over a two-week period, and extendable to three weeks. The activities can be adjusted to meet NGSS performance expectations at the high school or middle school level. The module provides opportunities for students to apply their understanding of core ideas in science and the engineering design process to invent their own stringed musical instrument. The module starts with students thinking about “What is sound?” and inventing their own simple “sound machine.” Then students engage in a number of activities to explore the properties of sound waves, vibrating strings, and resonators guided by questions such as “Why does the sound from a guitar or saxophone sound ‘musical’, and why does a guitar sound different from a ukulele or a violin?” Using free software apps, students conduct a structured scientific exploration of strings under tension to generate their own engineering data for designing a stringed instrument. The student teams then design and build their own stringed instruments mapped onto a specific frequency scale, taking into account the role of harmonics and resonances that give musical sound its pleasant richness. We will share the results from the classroom pilots, student and teacher feedback, along with pointers to instructional materials (slides, worksheets, resources) for your own classroom use.

Mihir Ravel, Cary Sneider, Dan Robinette and Steve Scannell

Physical Sciences

Patterns Physics: A 50-Year Energy Plan

This session aims to describe a 3D learning progression that bundles Physics, Earth Science, & Engineering through an Engineering Challenge to create a 50-Year Energy Plan based on Oregon 2015-2017 Biennium Energy Plan. After role playing Voices of the World, we begin with the phenomenon of building speakers and transition to creating an inexpensive electric guitar (generators). To explore how generators harness energy in nature we engineering design wind turbines and optimize solar cells. Creating the rubric to evaluate large scale power production launches us into climate science. With all the learning of the unit students and many real world constraints the unit culminates with arguing from evidence about their evaluations of the student created 50-Year Energy Plans.

Matt McCollum, Southridge High School

Physical Sciences

Patterns Physics: Engaging Students in NGSS 3D Learning Arc on Texting & Driving

This hands-on session aims to engage participants in a cross-curricular Texting & Driving project. This learning progression, like the 5 others that make-up the Patterns Approach to Physics, integrates Project Based Learning, Modeling, and the science and engineering practices of NGSS. The session will begin with an outside request (which can be tailored to individual school situations) to create a customizable App (spreadsheet) that predicts the distances involved in texting and driving, supporting students in determining the likelihood of getting into an accident in a variety of texting and driving situations. Participants will then, plan and conduct experiments to determine the mathematical models needed to code the App, and propose evidence-based solutions.

Stephen Scannell, Gresham High School

Physical Sciences

Radon, Hanford, and Nuclear Chemistry, Oh My: Social Justice Issues in Chemistry

In this social-justice themed unit, the phenomena of radon in homes in Portland is used as an anchoring phenomena to understand nuclear chemistry. We end the unit talking about another local nuclear issue: Hanford. An overview of the unit and resources will be shared.

Rachel Stagner, Madison High School


Middle Level (6-8)

Earth & Space Science

Ages of Rock-Exploring the Geologic Time Scale

Need an NGSS-aligned middle school unit on the geologic time scale? Or free video resources illustrating evolution in the animal kingdom and science careers? Then come join us and get your hands dirty in a lesson introducing the law of superposition and index fossils. View a couple brief video clips from Shape of Life (shapeoflife.org) and learn about more videos, resources and lesson plans. Most appropriate for middle to high school students.

Lacey Moore, Environmental and Science Education Consultant on behalf of Shape of Life

Physical Sciences

Hurricane Maria as a Phenomena to Drive a Middle School Chemistry Unit

This session leads teachers through the planning of a storyline through middle school chemistry performance expectations in the context of Hurricane Maria, disaster preparedness, and off-grid energy resources. Participants will engage in introductory discussion and question generation to see how the questions that arise from a phenomena lead the instructor in developing the lessons that follow. Participants will also experience an experiment-based argumentation gallery walk.

Melody Childers, Health and Science School

General Science

Ice, Ice, Baby: An Integrated 3D Storyline Unit for Middle School Science using Instant Ice Packs

The goal of this session is for attendees to receive an overview of an NGSS-designed 3D middle school integrated unit covering the nervous system (LS1-8), chemical reactions (PS1, PS3) and engineering design (ETS1). This session is designed for all levels of attendees from novice to advanced in three-dimensional NGSS instruction. Attendees will walk away with all the needed materials and strategies to implement this unit in a classroom. This unit was designed by practicing teachers using the storyline approach designed by Brian Reiser and colleagues. In this unit, students investigate why athletes ice injuries and how bodies respond to ice on an injury. This leads students to wonder why actual bags of ice are used instead of instant ice packs. Students investigate the chemical reaction occurring within an instant ice pack and work to develop a better design. Attendees will participate in activities designed to model how to implement strategies for integrating three-dimensional learning throughout this unit by asking questions about phenomena, creating explanatory models, and developing criteria for investigations and design solutions. Emphasis will be placed on how teachers facilitate and motivate students to drive instruction by emphasizing cause and effect and the transfer of energy and matter.

Kathryn Fleegal, Denver Public Schools

Earth & Space Science

SUPERMOON! Building a Literacy Infused STEAM Storyline

What is a Supermoon? Your students want to know! We use the "supermoon" phenomenon to build a STEAM storyline, including seamless support for practicing STEAM academic language. Leave with simple tools to help build and navigate your own literacy-infused storylines.

Kevin Carr, Pacific University Woodburn Campus

General Science

Tools to "Next-Genify" your Instruction

A Beaverton TOSA and expert in NGSSA together with a middle school science teacher who has been successful in implementing NGSS in her classroom will share what they have learned on making the instructional shifts that NGSS requires. Participants will walk away with tools that can be used right away for every unit that you teach. The focus of this session will be on sharing tools in four key areas where we can shift instruction that supports student understanding of anchoring phenomenon: 1. Using student questions to drive instruction, 2. Student discourse, 3. Making student thinking visible, and 4. Student explanations. Examples of student work will be given for all tools that will be shared.

Susan Holveck, Beaverton School Disitrict

Elementary

General Science

NGSS Storyline Coherence for K-5: Phenomena and Context-Based Units of Study for K-5

Experience an interactive and engaging overview of the Beaverton School District units of study. Engage students in coherent, cohesive three-dimensional learning investigations centering on phenomena and relevant context with a literacy lens. Receive links to actual units and information about the instructional decisions to move student learning towards meeting the NGSS standards.

Carol Biskupic Knight, Beaverton School District


Earth & Space Science

Demystifying STEM and the NGSS Through the Phenomenon of Earthquakes

STEM-based NGSS instruction can be engaging for students, easy for teachers, and bring achievement gains to schools. Based in the 5E, STEM science will provide avenues for the three dimensions of the K-12 Science Framework and Oregon standards. Technology-based simulations and engineering design challenges are part of the hands-on components in this study of the phenomenon of earthquakes. Waves and towers will be the models studied as you are seeking to find the balance in blended learning using digital technology and hands-on modeling in the solution of problems that are authentic and engaging for students.

Amanda Priest, STEMscopes




Buoying Math and Literacy with Science & Technology Integration

General Audiences

Engineering & Technology

Engineering the Oregon Trail

Robots on the Oregon Trail, you bet. Learners will code, engineer cargo vessels, and encounter numerous challenges traveling from Independence, MO to Oregon City, OR. This session was inspired by a team of 4th grade teachers wanting integrate iterative design, coding, and robots into a Social Studies unit. goo.gl/vkFLMH. Teams of learners will develop a working cargo vessel using using common materials pulled by an outside force (SPRK+ / Dash & Dot robots) along the Oregon Trail. Taking a large problem and breaking it into smaller pieces is crucial to success. Having limited time to build and test, decisions must be made quickly and teamwork skills applied. The Design/Prototype Team engineers a covered structure that is able to carry cargo and can attach to a spherical robot The Coding Team develops a programmed sequence for their robot to navigate a course without hitting barriers. Opportunities to “work the problem” occur constantly. Combining the robot to the cargo vessel forces the learner to account for forces and interactions. Cause and Effect can be identified based on evidence leading to redesigning of prototypes.

Larry Zurcher, Lake Oswego School District


Engineering & Technology

FIRST Robotics: It is about more than the robot

An overview of the four FIRST Robotics programs for students K – 12. Learn how math and literacy integrate into team-based programs where students design, build and program a robot to meet a thematic game challenge. In 2018/19 season, all students will participate in FIRST Launch: All Systems Go, an exploration of space. Collaboration and teamwork are key to success for engaging students to research, document and effectively present their work in a Coopertition™ environment. Known for being an afterschool program, increasingly, middle and high school teachers across Oregon are implementing FIRST programs into classroom instruction. This session will include information about program impact findings, mentor training, funding opportunities through the ODE and corporate sources, and fundamentals of each program.

Cathy Swider, Oregon Robotics Tournament & Outreach Program

General Science

If a Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words, a Simulation Is Worth a Million!

Math and Science topics come to life and student depth of understanding soars when using online simulations to introduce, develop and expand conceptual understanding. Participants will experience the incorporation of live simulations in a modeled lessons by manipulating variables, and engaging in "what-if" experimentation.

Julia Fischer, ExploreLearning

General Science

Integrating Chromebook™ with Vernier Technology

Participate in fun and engaging experiments using Vernier digital tools with Chromebooks to compare grip strength, investigate pressure and volume relationships, and match position graphs. See how sensor-based experiments teach students about data collection and analysis—practices that promote science inquiry, improve science literacy, and boost test scores.

Angie Harr, Vernier Software & Technology

Physical Sciences

Language Development in Earth and Physical Science

This workshop allows attendees to investigate a series of NGSS-aligned atmospheric phenomena through hands-on activities designed by the American Meteorological Society. Embedded supports are modeled for supporting English Language Learners in academic vocabulary acquisition. Phenomena include: cloud formation, the Coriolis Effect, and hurricanes. Nicole Safranek teaches high school physical science in a Newcomer program in Portland, Oregon and participated in the Project Atmosphere teacher workshop at the National Weather Service Training Center in July, 2018.

Nicole Safranek, Portland International Scholars Academy

Earth & Space Science

Robotics & Space: NASA in the classroom

Robotics and space exploration are a powerful and engaging tool for teaching engineering, technology, science, and math. This beginner level workshop gives teachers the background they need to make effective use of LEGO robotics and NASA resources in their classrooms. Through hands-on, open-ended design projects, participants will learn about applied engineering concepts, programming and related pedagogy. Throughout, we will focus on cross-curriculum elements and classroom implementation.

Hilda Pereyo, Oregon NASA Space Grant

High School (9-12)

General Science

3-D STEAM Projects Improve Independence and Perseverance in a High-Poverty Community

We present evidence for the positive impact of 3-D and project-based approach on STEAM education and student perseverance in a small school within a high poverty community.

Melissa Steinman, Waldport High School

Engineering & Technology

Bringing Controversial Subject Matter Into the Classroom: A Case Study Approach using Genetically Modified Organisms

GMOs are a particularly challenging subject because they involve highly technical science as well as social and cultural connections to food and medicines – areas that can be emotionally charged. There is increasing concern about public understanding of novel science and technology (Gupta et al. 2011). Rather than assuming the problem is simply a deficit of knowledge among the public, socio-cultural perspectives recognize that human cognitive processes, coupled with features of specific science and technology, lead to misconceptions, difficulty with complexity, and the use of heuristic (often biased) short cuts when learning about controversial issues (Sinatra et al. 2014). Thus, as recognized in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS; National Research Council 2011), there is a need to develop students’ abilities to think carefully and critically about science and technology. To do this effectively requires understanding of learners’ values, attitudes, and beliefs, so that content can be developed and delivered in ways that promote open-minded engagement (Ferguson et al. 2012, Sinatra et al. 2014). We will report on our case study approach to teaching about GMOs at the middle and high school levels along with a completed case study and accompanying curriculum that can be used in both formal and informal educational environments. In addition, we will report our research on the best practices for teachers to bring topics like GMOs or other similarly controversial subject matter into the classroom.

Jay Well, OSU Precollege Porgrams

Life Sciences

Journey 2050: Agriculture Education for the Next Generation

Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom will train teachers on an innovative educational computer game that explores food production and sustainability. Geared towards students in grades 6-12, Journey 2050 takes students on a virtual farm simulation. Using an inquiry based approach the program encourages students to make decisions and adjust them as they see their impact on society, the environment and the economy at a local and global scale.

Kassia Rudd, Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom

General Science

Language Support and Cooperative Learning Techniques in a Project-Based Classroom

Participants will engage in modified project based learning activities that emphasize student talk, writing, and reading of informational text in the science classroom. These activities are supported by discussion cards, dialogue strategies, and other tools that provide academic language support to students when speaking with partners or to groups.

Jeff Crapper, Beaverton School District

Earth & Space Science

Reaching New Depths in Understanding the Language of Science

Experience two differentiation tools for engaging multi-level classrooms in data interpretation and science reading. First, learn a technique to help your students understand a complex event like Kilauea’s eruption, while engaging them in active analysis and deep reading by using a color-coded text marking strategy with a NGSS Crosscutting Concept graphic organizer. In this session, you will read and mark one text, record earth system descriptions, and then analyze your findings in terms of four Crosscutting Concepts. This graphic organizer is easily modified for other science classes and differentiation. Text sources and leveling will also be addressed. Co-presenter teaches Earth/Space Science at a Portland polytechnic high school. Next, participate in a guided inquiry partner activity to interpret graphs of student data. Two levels of support provide beginner language learners a tool for engaging in academic conversations about a physics lab.   Co-presenter teaches NGSS Physics and language development at a high school program for recent immigrants in Portland.

Nicole Safranek, Portland Public Schools

Middle Level (6-8)

Engineering & Technology

Aerospace Connections K-12 from the Civil Air Patrol

Come learn about the many resources, lesson plans, activities, textbooks, and AE-related program information available from the Civil Air Patrol. Find out more about the Aerospace Connections in Education (ACE) program – a free, cross-curricular, grade-specific program for grades K-6. Check out the STEM Kit program with 15 different subject areas ranging from rocketry to computer programming and so much more. Discover resources for your classroom including grants, awards and special program opportunities such as cybersecurity and drones.

Hilda Pereyo, Civil Air Patrol

General Science

Claim-Evidence-Reasoning: The Value of Framing Scientific Argumentation in your ESL/Bilingual Classroom

CER is a way for students to explain observed phenomenon in a scientific way and how observations and data from an investigation are connected to science knowledge. This acclaimed and highly successful instructional strategy is changing how lab instructions are conducted and making science investigations meaningful for students. ELD strategies will be shared and modeled for an equitable learning environment.

Amanda Priest, STEMscopes

Engineering & Technology

Exploring Waves, Energy, and Community Impacts

Outline of a unit where students researched wave buoys, made mini wave buoys, calculated the power generated by their designs, and discussed the impact of these kinds of large-scale energy projects on Oregon coastal communities.

Megan Poole, Meadow Park Middle School

Earth & Space Science

STEM-ulating Activities on Human Ecology

Teaching human ecology makes for relevant lessons in the life and earth sciences that also brings in math, literacy and social science content. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in small-group problem solving, data analysis, online tool demonstration and discussion that cover a range of human ecology topics including human population and natural resource use trends, and their resulting impacts on ecosystems, biodiversity, climate and the availability of fresh water. A variety of teaching techniques will be outlined for a truly inclusive classroom. Participants will receive lesson plans in an electronic format.

Jennifer Wyld, Oregon State University

General Science

Utilizing Online Resources to Maximize Time

Working with time constraints is something that all teachers are all to familiar with. As we dive into the NGSS we have very little time left to research new tools and create new methods to assess students. We will explore a variety of online resources meant to cut planning time and discuss strategies for quickly identifying quality online resources. This is meant to be an interactive discussion where we share our favorite resources so please come prepared to share or learn from others.

Charity Staudenraus, Independent Educator


Learning Where you Live with Place-Based Education

Oregon Coast Aquarium's Coastal Learning Symposium

General Audiences

Earth & Space Science

Nurturing and Teaching a Sense of Wonder

Small children almost universally love science, nature, and technology. By the time they are high schoolers, many, if not most of them, have had their sense of wonder beaten out of them by curriculum that is more interested in meeting standards than fostering inquiry and exploration. There is no doubt that there is much that is good in NGSS and other current trends in science education, but could there be disadvantages too? Is it possible to nurture and teach a "Sense of Wonder" when you are madly trying to meet all of the Standards through a canned curriculum? Should you even try? This veteran teacher believes that there is one Prime Directive that supersedes all else in science teaching: "Nurturing a Sense of Wonder." Come here how he has stayed true to this directive over 35 years in science education in public and private schools, rural and urban schools, at a variety of socioeconomic levels, with students from pre-school to graduate school. You are guaranteed to leave this session pumped to explore the wonders of the natural world with your students.

Joe Minato, Wilson High School

General Science

How to Publish Your Student Projects for the Entire World to See

In this day of wide-spread social media, it is very apparent that students respond to being noticed.  This presentation shows you how to take your authentic, place-based science projects and turn them into published books that are sold on Amazon.  It can be very inexpensive and exceedingly rewarding for the students. Like all good things, it takes some extra work but the inspiration and long-lasting positive effects may change the motivation and life of every student who participates in the project. We know after publishing the book, Journey’s Flight, how this experience has changed the lives of many of the 60 participating students. Journey’s story has been followed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service and the National Wildlife Federation in numerous blogs.  Local TV attended the book publishing party and interviewed many students. Local newspapers ran a number of articles about the book and its success, interviewing students for the stories.  To date about 600 books have been sold, with a few as far away as Australia.

Jean Nave, Sisters, OR

General Science

Choice and Relevance in Place Based Education: Use Agile Project Management to Run a Place Based “Free-Choice Project Derby” in Your Classroom

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) mandate that we not only teach students about science we teach them how to do science as well. How can we make sure that students learn the science vocabulary and facts that they need while also teaching them to do science? One way would be to double or triple the amount of time we devote to teaching science. In a perfect world this would be the solution, but in reality, we have to learn to do both at the same time. We should learn to teach students about science while we teach them how to do science. Our classrooms must become laboratories where students learn science by doing science; therefore our students become active participants in locally relevant projects while they also learn all the facts and vocabulary that we want them to learn. As science teachers, we must become science project managers who also provide professional development opportunities for our scientists. By the end of this session, you will understand the science of motivation, embrace the science of creating excellent performers, and learn the best practices of Agile Project Management. You will learn the difference between performing an activity and practicing an activity. During the session, you will use the tools of Agile Project Management to create a Free Choice Project Derby focused on Place-Based Learning. As a participant, you will choose a topic area and create a Free Choice Project Derby on your chosen topic area for use in your classroom.

Andy Bedingfield, Taft 7-12

General Science

Developing Place-Based Field Study Programs in Rural Schools

In this session we will explore how Black Butte School has been able to develop an innovative Field Study program in a rural setting. We will share some of our successes and ongoing challenges as we attempt to create a program that genuinely engages our students with real world and local issues. We will discuss the unique opportunities and challenges rural schools face in using a place-based model. We recognize that there is no one size fits all curriculum with place -based education so we will share some of our resources but also encourage a discussion and sharing of resources amongst other rural schools trying to create similar programs in their local settings.

Delaney Sharp, Black Butte School

General Science

Forests as a Context For Place-Based Education

Nearly half our state is covered in forests. Forests filter our water, absorb carbon from the atmosphere, provide wildlife habitat, and supply wood and other resources as well as jobs in many rural communities. Come to this session and receive and review materials that will help you use forests as a unique, truly Oregon context for teaching and applying core concepts in science, social science, math and literacy.

Norie Dimeo-Ediger, Oregon Forest Resources Institute

General Science

Grounding STEM Education in Place

Place-based education is an approach to teaching and learning that involves engaging students in learning experiences that are situated in their local environment. These experiences can be potentially located in the school building, on school grounds, or in the local neighborhood, community, or even region. This presentation will provide examples of ways that teachers around the United States are using such learning to connect students more deeply to the natural phenomena and resources of their home community, gather data linked to citizen science projects or needs of local agencies or businesses, create presentations or printed materials regarding local topics or issues, or participate in problem-solving activities related to community concerns. Learning experiences like these provide an ideal opportunity for students to apply scientific knowledge and methods to meaningful aspects of their own lives and the lives of their families and neighbors. This session will provide participants with the opportunity to consider experiences that have deepened their own sense of place as well as ways local knowledge and investigations could be brought into their own classroom.

Gregory Smith, Lewis & Clark College

General Science

Haystack Rock Awareness Program: Education Through Stewardship, Art and Positive Action

Through positive messaging, engagement and education, the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, in its 33rd year, aims to educate visitors, students and all who are interested in the diverse ecosystems found in and around Haystack Rock in Cannon Beach. HRAP staff, via this hands-on presentation, will communicate creative projects and outreach which has resulted in connecting community members, students and visitors to this amazing, natural place. Furthermore, staff will detail how positive messaging and art based stewardship has changed the local community dialog about the program and increased volunteer based citizen science participation. Participants will be engaged in a marine debris related activity, which they can take back to their classrooms and/or organizations. HRAP staff and volunteers have realized over the years that it is only through positive educational connection that the true bond of stewardship can be forged.

Melissa Keyser, City of Cannon Beach Haystack Rock Awareness Program

General Science

Integrating Geography into K-8 field studies

Powell Butte Community Charter School (PBCCS) uses field investigations as an instructional tool to achieve a place based education mission. Learn how PBCCS incorporates geography into our regular field studies for K-8 grade students.

Kirin Stryker, Powell Butte Community Charter School

General Science

Looking for ways to get your students more involved with stewardship and citizen science?

Join other classes and schools who have adopted a mile of beach and participate in citizen science activities-- survey for marine mammals, beached birds, marine debris, sea stars and other animals, and help to document the year's highest tides through the King Tide Project. Adopting a mile as a class or school is a great way for children to learn about the natural world and how to protect it. Join this session to learn more about opportunities that can be continued back at your school and throughout the year.

Fawn Custer, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition/Coastwatch

Life Sciences

Making Waves with Technology: Engaging Learners and Integrating Relevance, Responsibility, and Resilience

This session presents several strategic activities that establish place-based relevance to local and global environmental issues by connecting students and communities through the use of technology. Building on students’ capacity for compassion, creativity, and current level of applied technological understanding, incorporating technology in environmental education supports the facilitation of project-based collaboration using an active, problem-centered approach. Establishing relevance is a necessary precursor for fostering environmental stewardship and responsibility. Making place-based connections to both local and global issues includes utilizing a variable model that leads to responsible human behavior toward the environment. Incorporating elements of technology can build relevance, establish equity, solidify interconnections, expand knowledge, and empower solutions.

Valerie Stephan-LeBoeuf, The Animals' Trust

General Science

Partnering Up to Facilitate Place-Based Learning

Developing meaningful partnerships is key to providing authentic place-based learning experiences. Learn the ins and outs of developing strong partnerships, hands-on field experiences and service learning opportunities that are unique and mutually beneficial.

Jenn Berry-O'Shea, Powell Butte Community Charter School

General Science

Place-based Education and Authenticity: Utilizing STEM to engage students in their community.

Place-based education will be presented as a community engagement model that builds connections for learners with cultural and natural resources. Eight case examples of placed-based programs that engage students in STEM will be discussed that provide insight to creating programs in any community.

Patrick Willis, OSU Extension

General Science

Place-Based Educator Networking

Connect with colleagues and meet new ones, while sharing new ideas and strategies for facilitating place-based learning opportunities at your school.

Sara Shaw Roberts, Oregon Coast Aquarium

General Science

Science and Ecotourism: Fostering unconventional partnership for authentic project based learning.

We will present opportunities to foster unconventional partnerships that allow authentic project based learning within ecotourism. These partnerships allow students to have an impact on their local economy and assist in the education of tourist to their region.

Melissa Steinman, Waldport High School

Earth & Space Science

Teaching Resources on Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami Science, Hazards, and Emergency Preparedness

Teachers on the Leading Edge (TOTLE; 2008-11) and Cascadia EarthScope, Earthquake, and Tsunami Education Program (CEETEP; 2012-16) have introduced scores of Oregon science teachers to Cascadia earthquake and tsunami science, hazards, and emergency preparedness. Animations and Lesson Plans translate Cascadia plate tectonics, earthquake and tsunami processes, and EarthScope research for novice learners. This session will emphasize educational resources particularly important for teachers in Oregon coastal communities. Lesson plans are aligned with NGSS, including engineering applications of science. Participants will receive DVDs with all TOTLE and CEETEP educational resources.

Robert Butler, University of Portland

High School (9-12)

General Science

How Place-Based STEAM Projects Have Improved Perseverance & Independence in a Rural Community

Waldport High School on the central Oregon Coast has been reinventing our Career and Technology Education (CTE) programs through STEAM Place- and Project-Based Learning (PBL). This has provided us with concrete ways to incorporate the three dimensions of NGSS into our PBL/CTE opportunities for kids. In January, 2016 we secured a large CTE grant from the Oregon Department of Education that allowed us to incorporate our 3D ideas across curriculum and create new STEAM Career Pathways to improve equity for all of our students, as our community has a very low college graduation rate. Our new emphasis on 3D learning has resulted in large, positive changes. With technology tools and the strong emphasis on perseverance and PBL, students have developed a critical mass of skills that lead to independent, problem solving actions. The mindset of our students has changed; we can now say “solve your problem” and they no longer balk at using engineering and tools to problem-solve.This will focus on how schools can make such changes and accrue evidence for the impact on student learning.

Kama Almasi, Lincoln County School District

Intermediate (3-5)

General Science

Place-based Education in Elementary School: Bringing Science to the Community

By elementary school, students are ready to fully engage in “community science.” Come see how teachers at the Cottonwood School of Civics and Science have transformed student learning into an opportunity to teach. Example projects include a geology “quest” designed for downtown Portland, student-made exhibits for Portland State University’s Archaeology Roadshow, and an educational letter campaign to replace an outdated culvert in an urban creek.

Susan Hathaway, The Cottonwood School of Civics and Science

General Science

STEMtastic Elementary Family Events: Increase community engagement without losing your mind

K-5 Educators and Administrators: Focus your next event night on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)! Family events provide elementary school communities with opportunities to connect and learn together, and they don’t have to be hard to implement. In this session, coordinators from the Oregon Coast STEM Hub will share tips, tricks and lessons learned from elementary STEM nights and science fairs held on the central Oregon coast. We’ll share lessons, activities and ready-to-go materials that simplify planning and engage families, and show examples of ways to incorporate help from local STEM professionals and agencies.

Kara Allan, Lincoln County School District


Middle Level (6-8)

General Science

Place-based Education in Middle School: “Doing” Science and Becoming Advocates for our Earth

As highlighted by the Next Generation Standards, science is not just something you read about in a book, it is something you do! Middle school students are at an age when they are ready to apply their skills and knowledge to the world around them by asking questions, conducting fieldwork, and advocating for a sustainable future. Learn how middle school students at the Cottonwood School of Civics and Science are providing valuable ecological data to the city of Portland, influencing public policy, and making connections between local and global issues.

Chris Wyland, The Cottonwood School or Civics and Science

Elementary

General Science

Place-based Education in the Primary Grades: Problem-solving and Play

What does place-based education look like in the primary grades? Come learn about practices used by primary teachers at the Cottonwood School of Civics and Science to develop curiosity and empathy for both the natural and human communities in which students live. Literacy integration, fieldwork, and the Scottish teaching method Storyline are featured strategies that will be illustrated in the presentation.

Nesa Levy, The Cottonwood School of Civics and Science


General Science

Place-based Education in Elementary School: Bringing Science to the Community

By elementary school, students are ready to fully engage in “community science.” Come see how teachers at the Cottonwood School of Civics and Science have transformed student learning into an opportunity to teach. Example projects include a geology “quest” designed for downtown Portland, student-made exhibits for Portland State University’s Archaeology Roadshow, and an educational letter campaign to replace an outdated culvert in an urban creek.

Susan Hathaway, The Cottonwood School of Civics and Science

General Science

STEMtastic Elementary Family Events: Increase community engagement without losing your mind

K-5 Educators and Administrators: Focus your next event night on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)! Family events provide elementary school communities with opportunities to connect and learn together, and they don’t have to be hard to implement. In this session, coordinators from the Oregon Coast STEM Hub will share tips, tricks and lessons learned from elementary STEM nights and science fairs held on the central Oregon coast. We’ll share lessons, activities and ready-to-go materials that simplify planning and engage families, and show examples of ways to incorporate help from local STEM professionals and agencies.

Kara Allan, Lincoln County School District


Supervisors/Administrators

General Science

Planning for Place-based Education: Resource Sharing

Place-based education is not just a “add-on” to school as usual. So, how to you do it? Where do you start? Join this networking session for interested teachers and administrators led by The Cottonwood School of Civics and Science leadership team. We will bring planning sheets, helpful guides, and other resources to facilitate a conversation that may include topics such as partnership development, assessment, project planning and more.

Sarah Anderson, The Cottonwood School of Civics and Science




Science Education Resources and Strategies

General Science

Modeling and the NGSS: Think Out Loud the Scientific Way!

Participate in engaging activities designed to clarify and teach scientific modeling to elementary and middle school students. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) emphasize the importance of scientific practices as a context for teaching disciplinary core ideas. Modeling is a key component of scientific practices, yet teachers find teaching scientific modeling somewhat daunting as it differs from the pedagogical modeling they typically employ. This session will clarify what is meant by “scientific modeling” and introduce a set of teacher-tested lessons designed to be fun and informative for elementary and middle school students. These lessons address scientific modeling, while addressing specific aspects of the nature of science included in the NGSS. They are based on current research in scientific practices and nature of science instruction, and are designed to link abstract concepts to more familiar process-skills, such as observing and inferring. With these engaging strategies and activities, students can learn that science is more than content to be memorized. It is also a set of practices and a way knowing—a dynamic enterprise relevant to their everyday lives.

Randy Bell, Oregon State University

General Science

NLM’s Online Playground: K-12 Science and Health Education Resources

This session will introduce the freely available K-12 science information resources provided by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Participants will be equipped with knowledge of NLM science education resources to support teacher curriculum as well as providing information support for students and parent homework needs.

Carolyn Martin, National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Northwest Region (NNLM PNR)

General Science

Using Accountable Talk and Responsive Assessment Strategies to Deepen Student Understanding

I plan to share the routines and structures I establish in my classroom centered around group roles and accountable talk that create a collaborative approach to mastering content. I have implemented collaborative study groups in my 6th grade science classes and have witnessed a marked improvement in students' ability to discuss the content academically, make sense of classroom investigations, and apply that understanding to new situations. At the end of the unit, students complete a summative assessment independently. I have developed a coding system in Google Sheets to keep track of their initial proficiency on each assessment item. I initially grade the tests, keeping track of their answers in google sheets and return the tests with no marks. Students then participate in groups to prove/disprove their initial thinking, engage in productive arguments to clear up misconceptions, and cite evidence to support their ideas.

Jessica Augden, Alder Creek Middle School



971-361-OSTA

4110 SE Hawthorne Blvd, PO Box 1025
Portland, Oregon
97214

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